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Fiddler's Ferry Public Consultation


This image: a photograph of Fiddler's Ferry Power Station.
							 The map: the map shows the site boundary of the proposed first
							 phase of redevelopment of Fiddler's Ferry, with Widnes to the
							 west and Warrington to the northeast.


Welcome to the public consultation for the first phase of Fiddler's Ferry. This interactive website will guide you through the proposals. At the end we will ask you to complete a short survey.


info Scroll this menu and look out for red highlighted text like this - it will indicate interactive features on the map.


Your views really matter to us, and we are excited to share our initial plans with you.

We are in the design phase, and the thoughts of local residents and businesses will help us shape the final designs. The sections below set out what we would like to achieve.

The survey will close on Sunday 11th December 2022. We will then use the feedback provided to influence future design decisions.




Map Key

Phase 1 Development

History


This image: a photograph of Fiddler's Ferry Power Station,
							 		 taken during construction of the cooling towers.
		 							 The map: the map shows an Ordnance Survey map of the local
									 area from 1849, before the power station was built. Fiddler's
									 Ferry Inn and ferry service are marked on the map to the east
									 of the site. There are interactive markers on the map which
									 show historic photographs of the power station and some
									 recollections from our contributors.

Standing on the north bank of the River Mersey, Fiddler's Ferry has been a prominent landmark for half a century. The coal-fired power station was first proposed in 1962. It was named after the nearby Ferry Inn. This stands on the site of an old ferry which once shuttled people across the Mersey. In the late 19th century the ferry service stopped running but by then, the name had stuck.


info This historic map shows the area as it was in 1849, with the Fiddler's Ferry Inn and ferry service marked to the east of the site.


The power station was built between 1964 and 1971. Generators came online in 1971, and the plant was fully operational by 1973. Initially, the coal burnt here was sourced from South Yorkshire and in later years the coal was imported.


info Thank you to everyone who has shared their memories and photos of Fiddler's Ferry with us. Click on the map markers to see some of these photos and read contributor's memories.


The plant generated electricity for over 50 years before it reached the end of its intended lifespan. Originally operated by Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) and subsequently owned by several companies. In 2004, SSE bought it and operated it until its closure.

Efforts were made to reduce the pollution the plant emitted but had little impact. The emissions caused by coal led to the country seeking cleaner, alternative power sources. This, combined with the age of the power station, caused the closure and decommissioning of the site by SSE in 2020.

Thousands of local people have worked at Fiddler's Ferry over the years. While there are few jobs on the site now, we hope our plans can bring it back as a major employer for local people.


Deetu · History
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Map Key

Phase 1 Development
Historic photographs of the site courtesy of SSE and our contributors
Contributors' memories of Fiddler's Ferry

What will happen next?


This image: a stock photograph of a construction worker's
							 		 PPE equipment on a construction site.
		 							 The map: the map shows satellite imagery of how the site
									 currently looks, with the Phase 1 site boundary overlaid on
									 the fromer coal stockyard. There is an interactive map marker
									 over the cooling towers, which shows a 360 degree panorama
									 of the current site conditions when clicked on.

Fiddler's Ferry has been identified in Warrington Council's Draft Local Plan. This is for residential and employment use and new open space. The Council has identified the former power station and adjacent land as somewhere with potential to fulfil the future needs of Warrington and Widnes.


info Click on the map marker to enter a 360 degree panorama of the power station and to explore the current site.


With the size of the site (1,760 homes and 101 hectares of employment land), we can't build everything at once. We will be doing this in phases and will be developing multiple planning applications over the coming 15 years. This will help ensure the potential of the site is realised.

You may have heard news about our plans to demolish part of the site, and you can find out more about this at
fiddlersferry.com. This consultation website is for what will happen after this part of the site has been cleared.

The initial phase for redeveloping Fiddler's Ferry Power Station is to remediate and develop the former coal stockyard. This development will provide a major employment opportunity of roughly 36.5 hectares / 90 acres.

In years past, many local people have been employed at Fiddler's Ferry and our plans would revive this employment. The first phase of employment development will secure modern, new and alternative employment for up to 2,100 people. This will provide training opportunities and providing new skills to the workforce in the area.


Deetu · What Will Happen Next
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Map Key

Phase 1 Development
Wider Development Framework
Railway line
360 panorama of the existing site

Our Vision


This image: an artist's visualisation of how the whole
					 		 development could look once all phases are complete.
 							 The map: the map shows wider development framework, currently
							 proposed. This website is only consulting on the first phase
							 of redevelopment to the west of the site.

We are preparing a Development Framework which will set out the principles of what will be delivered on the entire site. We are intending to consult on a draft Development Framework in early 2023. The Draft Warrington Local Plan sets out many of the details which will be included.

Included in the wider plans are a new community with a minimum of 1,760 new homes, and the infrastructure these homes would require. This could include a new primary school, local shops, space for a potential branch GP surgery, other community facilities, parks and open space. These new homes, including affordable homes, would help to address the housing crisis in Warrington.

Locally, over 5,500 applicants are on the Council's housing list, including hundreds of families. This is so high because there is a shortage of all types of homes, not just social homes. Many young people and families cannot afford to buy or rent a home that meets their needs.

In a
2016 report, the Council stated the median rent for a property was £550 per month while recent market research suggests this has risen to £795 per month, a 44% increase. Meanwhile, first time buyers are spending on average £58,000 more than they would have in 2016.

An integral part of our plan is the ambition to deliver a beautiful and wildlife rich parkland for everyone to enjoy.

Currently, much of the land, such as the ash lagoons, is not safe for the public to access. We need to excavate the ash that has been deposited. This will allow the restoration of these areas of the site to beneficial community use.

We have to do a lot of work to make sure the decades of ash and waste on the wider site is safely removed. This can be used as a sustainable construction material. Once this is complete, we will work to create a quality parkland that will be an asset for everyone living nearby.


Deetu · Our Vision
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Map Key

Phase 1 Development
Wider Development Framework
Railway line
Proposed future phases:
Employment
Residential
Mixed use centre
Primary school
Open space
Mixed use and park hub

First Step of Redevelopment


This image: an illustrative photograph of how the proposed
					 		 phase 1 buildings could look.
 							 The map: the map shows the phase 1 site boundary, with the
							 masterplan overlaid. This shows the proposed building and road
							 layouts, with a battery storage area to the north of the site.
							 Interactive map markers show more information about each aspect
							 when clicked on.

A chronic shortage of modern employment space has developed in the area over recent years. Our plans look to address this. By providing land to meet future needs we can help current and future employers of the residents of Warrington and Widnes. This will ensure they have the space they need to build successful companies and create secure jobs.

The former coal stockyard is developable in the short-term. Other parts of the wider site will be cleared and made suitable for redevelopment on a phased basis. The employment element of the masterplan will secure the regeneration the largest brownfield sites in the region.


info Click on the map markers to read more about the proposals.


The four new buildings we are planning will be for businesses looking for logistical and manufacturing space. They will have supporting offices and a total of 1.35 million sq. ft of space. These new spaces will create opportunities for existing and new businesses to invest in modern more sustainable premises. Businesses will be able to operate more efficiently and effectively.

This first phase of redevelopment will support roughly 485 construction jobs a year during the build phase. Businesses in the local supply chain will benefit with additional jobs supported throughout the project. Once completed, up to an estimated 2,100 jobs will be supported by the businesses which occupy the space.


Deetu · First Step Of Redevelopment
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Map Key

Phase 1 Development
Proposed buildings
Proposed battery storage
Railway line
More information about the proposals

Sustainability


This image: an illustrative photograph of how the proposed
					 		 phase 1 buildings could look.
 							 The map: the map shows the phase 1 site boundary, with the
							 masterplan overlaid. This shows the proposed building and road
							 layouts, with a battery storage area to the north of the site.
							 Interactive map markers show more information about potential
							 and proposed sustainability actions when clicked on.

Peel NRE have a commitment to ensuring that buildings reduce carbon emissions and bring us closer to Net-Zero. The development will achieve a minimum BREEAM 'Very Good' rating, with an ambition for higher. Energy and water efficiency will be key targets within the BREEAM strategy.

The buildings will undergo a Life Cycle Assessment to calculate and reduce carbon emissions where possible. They will have an all-electric services strategy. This will include on-site renewable energy generation.


info Click on the map markers to read more about proposed and potential sustainable actions on the site.


We are exploring the options the site could provide, and we hope to reuse much of the material on site. This could mean reusing much of the concrete generated from the demolition in the redevelopment of the site. This could prevent the creation of tons of CO2. Reusing existing materials will reduce carbon emissions from the production and haulage.

More considerate actions like this will reduce carbon emissions of the development. Modern construction materials and methods will also help. While we are not consulting on it yet, this is a commitment we will hold for the wider site.

We have a commitment to create a 10% net gain for biodiversity. This means improving the site or nearby areas for wildlife, and local flora and fauna. You can find out more about
this commitment here.


Deetu · Sustainability
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Map Key

Phase 1 Development
Proposed buildings
Proposed battery storage
Railway line
More information about sustainability

Connectivity


This image: an illustrative photograph of how the proposed
					 		 phase 1 buildings could look.
 							 The map: the map shows the phase 1 site boundary, with the
							 masterplan overlaid. This shows the proposed building and road
							 layouts, with a battery storage area to the north of the site.
							 The map also shows the proposed vehicular access, pedestrian and
							 cycle routes, existing bus route on Widnes Road, and the proposed
							 bus route extension into the site. There is a new proposed bus
							 stop just inside the site off Widnes Road. Interactive markers
							 at the junction of the site and Widnes Road, and further up the
							 road by the existing bus stops, show detailed drawings of road
							 improvements when clicked on.

The proximity of Warrington and Widnes makes this a strategic location. Providing employment space here will reduce the distances people to travel to work.

The existing road access to the site will be used for the vehicle access to the site. This is located on the A562 Widnes Road. We will be adding footpaths to allow pedestrians to safely use the junction. A pelican crossing is proposed further west, in between near the bus stop. This would improve the safety of bus users working at the site.


info Click on the map markers to view detailed drawings of the proposed Phase 1 access arrangement, junction improvements and pelican crossing.


The site is serviced by the 32 bus route between Warrington and Widnes and the 110 route between Warrington and Runcorn, via Widnes. The 110 service begins at roughly 5.00am in Runcorn and reaches the site by 5.45am. In the opposite direction the earliest service arrives at 6.15am. Services run regularly throughout the day.

Combined with the less frequent 32 service, this is an existing sustainable public transport link. However, we recognise this is not the limit of the options. We will attempt to work with local bus operators to make travelling to the development easier. With this in mind, we are exploring the potential for a bus service along the access road into the site.

Allowing employees to travel to work sustainably is an ambition we have for the site. As part of this, we will be creating walking and cycling routes through the site. These will link to existing routes on its boundaries.


Deetu · Connectivity
Read audio transcript

Map Key

Phase 1 Development
Proposed buildings
Proposed battery storage
Railway line
Detailed drawings of proposed improvements
Proposed vehicular access
Proposed pedestrian and cycle routes
Existing bus routes
Proposed bus routes
Existing bus stop
Proposed bus stop

Your Thoughts


This image: an illustrative image of a group of people having a
					 friendly discussion.
					 The map: the map shows the phase 1 site boundary, with the
					 masterplan overlaid. This shows the proposed building and road
					 layouts, with a battery storage area to the north of the site.
					 There is an interactive map marker which opens the survey when
					 clicked on.

Thank you for taking the time to read more about our proposals for Fiddler's Ferry. Remember, this consultation is just asking for your views on the first phase of development, and not the wider site.

Please complete the short survey below. Your views really matter to us.




The survey will close on Sunday 11th December 2022.

The project team are hosting two public exhibitions on the 22nd and 28th November 2022, with a third local event in Penketh on the 7th December 2022. These events are free to attend and there is no need to book a place in advance.

To find out more about these events and where they will be held, please click here.


Map Key

Phase 1 Development
Proposed buildings
Proposed battery storage
Railway line
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